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SpeechRunTime.exe


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I have the same problem on my 2 computers.

Problem: ActiveX/COM Issue    

Data: LocalServer32\C:\Windows\SysWOW64\Speech_OneCore\Common\SpeechRuntime.exe -ToastNotifier    

Registry Key: HKCR\CLSID\{265b1075-d22b-41eb-bc97-87568f3e6dab}
 

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35 minutes ago, Gilles Beauvisage said:

I have the same problem on my 2 computers.

Problem: ActiveX/COM Issue    

Data: LocalServer32\C:\Windows\SysWOW64\Speech_OneCore\Common\SpeechRuntime.exe -ToastNotifier    

Registry Key: HKCR\CLSID\{265b1075-d22b-41eb-bc97-87568f3e6dab}
 

It is NOT a problem.

Please read here, it is needed by Windows.

https://community.ccleaner.com/topic/59965-speechruntimeexe/?tab=comments#comment-327606

 

CCleaner documentation can be found here

https://www.ccleaner.com/docs/ccleaner

Support contact

https://support.piriform.com/hc/en-us/requests/new

support@ccleaner.com

 

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I, too, have noticed that Ccleaner has recently been flagging the above registry error on my system the past few days...

I understand and agree with the warnings about registry cleaning in Windows 10...

BUT, I've found some REALLY WEIRD behavior in Ccleaner in this instance!

 

First of all, on my computer the file in question  (SpeechRuntime.exe)  exists in the   C:\Windows\System32\Speech_OneCore\Common\   folder.

It is NOT present in the   C:\Windows\SysWOW64\Speech_OneCore\Common\   folder.

 

I understand why Ccleaner will flag the error if a registry entry points to the non-existent SysWOW64 location.

 

NOW. if I open Ccleaner, and run the Registry Cleaner, I see the entry for

LocalServer32\C:\Windows\SysWOW64\Speech_OneCore\Common\SpeechRuntime.exe -ToastNotifier .

 

If I right-click that entry, and select "Open in RegEdit...", Regedit opens to the expected key, showing the value

LocalServer32\C:\Windows\SysWOW64\Speech_OneCore\Common\SpeechRuntime.exe -ToastNotifier  , as expected.

 

BUT, if I simply close RegEdit, and reopen it to the same key, the value NOW shows the "correct" location

LocalServer32\C:\Windows\System32\Speech_OneCore\Common\SpeechRuntime.exe -ToastNotifier .

 

1942427351_Ccleanererror.thumb.png.bfc3843ae6b0c4198238a443be2293d3.png

 

WHY is Ccleaner finding an erroneous registry value that apparently doesn't actually exist?

And how can the value seem to change with simply closing regedit, and reopening to the same key?

 

Edited by tzdvl
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As said above this particular registry entry is for future use by Windows version 21H1.
(Although some things are using it now).

Some components of 21H1 are already on your computer, but not all of them will be there yet.
Some are already there but are hidden from you by Windows itself.

They will only be fully activated when the update to version 21H1 is 'Enabled' by Microsoft.

It's simply the way that Microsoft are doing updates by downloading things in a gradual fashion and then 'Enabling' them when the time is right.
They are doing it that way so that the 'Enablement' is quicker than downloading a new version all at once.

*** Out of Beer Error ->->-> Recovering Memory ***

Worried about 'Tracking Files'? Worried about why some files come back after cleaning? See this link:
https://community.ccleaner.com/topic/52668-tracking-files/?tab=comments#comment-300043

 

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I guess what I'm interested to know is, how is Ccleaner's registry cleaner "finding" and displaying an "erroneous" registry key that doesn't seem to actually exist?

If I just simply open RegEdit, and navigate to the key  HKCR\CLSID\{265b1075-d22b-41eb-bc97-87568f3e6dab}\LocalServer32

the (default) value shown is  C:\Windows\System32\Speech_OneCore\Common\SpeechRuntime.exe -ToastNotifier

 

But if I open Ccleaner and run the registry cleaner it displays the entry

LocalServer32\C:\Windows\SysWOW64\Speech_OneCore\Common\SpeechRuntime.exe -ToastNotifier

If I then right-click that entry, and select "Open in RegEdit...", RegEdit opens to the VERY SAME key, but the (default) value NOW shows

C:\Windows\SysWOW64\Speech_OneCore\Common\SpeechRuntime.exe -ToastNotifier

 

If I then close RegEdit (and Ccleaner, WITHOUT actually running the cleaner), reopen RegEdit, and navigate back to the same key, the (default) value has reverted back to showing

C:\Windows\System32\Speech_OneCore\Common\SpeechRuntime.exe -ToastNotifier

 

How is this possible? I've never seen a registry value change back and forth like that.

How can Ccleaner appear to change a registry value without actually selecting the entry and running the cleaner?

Edited by tzdvl
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Quote

  I don't understand how Ccleaner can be detecting a registry key/value that doesn't seem to exist if I search RegEdit for that same key.

Again:

Quote

Some components of 21H1 are already on your computer, but not all of them will be there yet.
Some are already there but are hidden from you by Windows itself.

Reply from Nukecad:

Quote

 

So Windows itself is hiding it from you in RegEdit; CCleaner is seeing past that block though.

If you are asking how CCleaner is seeing past that block then it's a whole different question.
And you probably won't get an answer, why should the CCleaner developers give others/rivals a clue to how it looks for things?

Yes, it's all a bit strange from how we are all used to Windows working in the past - and we are all having to work out the changes.

 

 

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1 hour ago, tzdvl said:

So Windows itself is hiding it from you in RegEdit; CCleaner is seeing past that block though.

If you are asking how CCleaner is seeing past that block then it's a whole different question.
And you probably won't get an answer, why should the CCleaner developers give others/rivals a clue to how it looks for things?

(Except the above quote wasn't me replying...)

Ah, Thanks! That makes sense.

 

It appears Ccleaner is able to detect registry entries that are hidden from us mere mortals, but also is "wise" enough to not mess with those hidden entries.

Ccleaner just TEASES us, by repeatedly showing an entry as an error, even though it can't (shouldn't) actually be fixed!

 

Glad I'm not the one sorting all this out!

And thanks to you moderators for the excellent advice!

 

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1 hour ago, tzdvl said:

(Except the above quote wasn't me replying...)

A thousand apologies.

I seem to have edited your post instead of quoting it.

I could blame technical reasons from the forum moderator options, I could blame my disability causing lack of concentration - But no excuses - I made an error, sorry about that.

*** Out of Beer Error ->->-> Recovering Memory ***

Worried about 'Tracking Files'? Worried about why some files come back after cleaning? See this link:
https://community.ccleaner.com/topic/52668-tracking-files/?tab=comments#comment-300043

 

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4 hours ago, tzdvl said:

Ccleaner just TEASES us, by repeatedly showing an entry as an error, even though it can't (shouldn't) actually be fixed!

 

That's one of the issues with registry cleaners as smart as they may seem they're dumb as bricks and require a human to make the decision - possibly one of the reasons why CCleaner's registry cleaner never got an auto-cleaning feature even though it's been a requested feature umpteen times.

Some registry data points to what appears to be nothing but isn't necessarily safe to remove, it's been that way in every version of Windows I've used since the Win98 era. The problem here is with Windows 10 being an actively updated operating system messing around with it and references pointing to the OS folder "C:\Windows" is possibly a recipe for disaster, and I'd personally think that the AppData and ProgramData folders should be off limits too.

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It has been claimed by the moderators in earlier comments that CCleaner should not be used on Windows 10 and certainly not on a regular basis but that statement is confusing because in CCleaner's settings it offers to start CCleaner with Windows.

And further down the Options headings under the "Schedule" tab it allows CCleaner to be run at a regular interval as chosen by the operator. If, as advised here, CCleaner should not be used as a regular tool on Windows 10 why are these options available?

Beerless

 

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2 minutes ago, Beerless said:

It has been claimed by the moderators in earlier comments that CCleaner should not be used on Windows 10 and certainly not on a regular basis but that statement is confusing because in CCleaner's settings it offers to start CCleaner with Windows.

And further down the Options headings under the "Schedule" tab it allows CCleaner to be run at a regular interval as chosen by the operator. If, as advised here, CCleaner should not be used as a regular tool on Windows 10 why are these options available?

Beerless

 

It's just the registry  cleaner part of CCleaner which should not be run on Windows 10.

The 'normal' part of CCleaner is perfectly safe to run. :)

CCleaner documentation can be found here

https://www.ccleaner.com/docs/ccleaner

Support contact

https://support.piriform.com/hc/en-us/requests/new

support@ccleaner.com

 

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  • 1 month later...

"Reserved for future use" meets the Windows 10 registry LOL.   One of my OCD friends who likes to "run a tight clean ship", did not like that he just excludes the entry, instead of [a] understanding it and [b] fixing it.  Yes, I'm talking about the famous Speech Toast Notifier, interesting name...

The ironic thing is that I do definitely believe in registry cleaners, once a program [The 25th anniversary edition of Paragon's Hard Disk Manager] installed, and it was supposed to run at boot time (when Windows starts), but it did not - because the registry entry for it (in the RunOnce startup) had a mistake in it!  Proof that we do need things like CCleaner, even if they trip up from time to time.  

And thank you, whoever it was, for mentioning using a chainsaw when cutting the Sunday roast - wonderful image there LOL!

171588917_doubleentrymistakeinregistrywhichccleanerfoundandhelpedmecorrectandtellthedeveloperstoo.thumb.jpg.5899293e86391320c327ec95cca4203d.jpg

 

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11 minutes ago, mtjoy747 said:

 I'm talking about the famous Speech Toast Notifier, interesting name...

I'll raise a glass to that.

PS. Enjoy your Sunday roast, however you choose to carve it.

*** Out of Beer Error ->->-> Recovering Memory ***

Worried about 'Tracking Files'? Worried about why some files come back after cleaning? See this link:
https://community.ccleaner.com/topic/52668-tracking-files/?tab=comments#comment-300043

 

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  • 4 months later...

This thread is full of misinformation.

64-bit Windows 7 and later implement the registry in the same way. There is a 32-bit registry for 32-bit programmes and a 64-bit registry for 64-bit programmes. The 32-bit registry contains a link to "C:\Windows\SysWOW64\Speech_OneCore\Common\SpeechRuntime.exe -ToastNotifier" and the 64-bit registry contains a link to "C:\Windows\System32\Speech_OneCore\Common\SpeechRuntime.exe -ToastNotifier". There is no 32-bit version of SpeechRuntime.exe, but Windows' Registry Reflector, which implements the compatibility layer for 32-bit programmes on 64-bit Windows, dynamically reflects the 64-bit key into the 32-bit registry, modifying System32 to SYSWOW64.

There are specific things that the application developer should do when writing a 64-bit application. If they wish the application to also run on 32-bit systems, as they did here, they should also include the 32-bit binary. Microsoft has failed here, providing some DLLs (e.g. sapi_onecore.dll) for both architectures but failing to provide others, including this one, for the 32-bit platform. Furthermore, they've added the LocalServer32 string in the correct place - "Computer\HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\CLSID\{265b1075-d22b-41eb-bc97-87568f3e6dab}", corresponding to its class ID - but added the Application Name and ID in an incorrect place - "Computer\HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\CLSID\{265b1075-d22b-41eb-bc97-87568f3e6dab" (missing the closing curly brace).

The long and short of it is that CCleaner correctly identifies this as an erroneous registry key because Microsoft needs to fix a bug in the application. Should you delete this registry key?

Well, deleting the registry key will make the result go away in CCleaner. This particular registry "error" is not a problem with the registry but the application. If you want to delete it, go ahead - the key is already sufficiently broken that it can't do anything as it can't resolve the AppId. If Microsoft ever fixes the application to run correctly, Windows Installer will recreate the key when Windows Update pushes the new version out.

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@robmoss2kis full of cringe maybe.. They didn't go to school ... to understand that a man wants help, don't talk about the computer and what windows does and doesn't do.Nothing usefull .. maybe a program that helps you delete the key .. or a tutorial .. or how to get permission .. a first class degeneration .. CRINGE !!

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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