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Windows XP Reinstall

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Have just finished reinstalling windows from the factory disks. What a change, wish I had done it long ago. This old computer had slowed down a lot, but it was so gradual that I didn't notice it much.

 

Maybe everybody knows this stuff, but I just wanted to post this because I bet there are lots of members like me, who were reluctant to do a reinstall. I sure am glad I did it. Muuuch faster now.

 

The reinstall process took most of 2 days, going slowly and keeping notes and backups. It was not straightforward.

 

A big thank you to the members & moderators here: If I had not been hanging around here for a long time, learning bits and pieces, I would have been stuck at the "DISK BOOT FAILURE, INSERT SYSTEM DISK AND PRESS ENTER" screen which appeared early on.

 

- Uninstalling the unwanted OEM applications took 3 or 4 hours. Had to backtrack a couple of times, wrecked something.

 

- After SP3, there were 94 critical updates for xp home, and maybe 10 or twelve more for hardware and non-critical updates. > whew< At least 3 hours.

 

- The rest of the time went to reinstalling and backing up.

 

- IE8 ... Still thinking about it, not a fan yet. It is slower ...no tekkie am I but I do know the difference between fast and slow (don't want to start a fight here, just saying). I'm certainly going to use Opera for most things. Hat tip to Hazelnut, way ahead of the game as usual. 4.gif

 

- CCleaner is wonderful for helping with...well...cleanup. Am ashamed to say it, but this is the first time I had used it except for an occasional experiment. CCleaner offers a lot of functions in a small, fast application. Most other cleaner-uppers were waaay too aggressive.

 

What I found out:

- It is worth the time to make a backup image and a boot disk...a few hours up front to save a few days later.

- As DennisD pointed out elsewhere, always verify the image and check the boot disk.

- Take the time to check that backup image, file, whatever, & make sure it actually will restore. Mine didn't

- I used something else, but Macrium Reflect offers a freebie. LINK TO IT Dennis is the resident Macrium expert.

- It is worth the time to download xp service pack 2 & 3 in advance. That way you can have them on CD and install them first.

- Nobody should need to know so much just to use a computer. :P

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Well done on coming out the other end of that in one piece. :lol:

 

It's a long time ago since I reinstalled Windows, but I remember the time taken getting rid of Norton, Sonic, MS Works and a lot of other bloated unwanted stuff, and then the MS Patches to catch up with.

 

I don't have Windows Disks, and I now don't have the Recovery Partition as I merged it with my C: drive to make sure I never did it again. I use Macrium Backup Images now if things go a**e over t*t.

 

You can now go and have a lie down.

:)

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...

You can now go and have a lie down.

:)

 

Thank you for the kind words. However, after all this coffee, I may not sleep again until August. :P

 

Edit: Posted this here in security forum because really the best reason to have a backup image is malaware recovery.

Edited by login123

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- It is worth the time to download xp service pack 2 & 3 in advance. That way you can have them on CD and install them first.

You can download SP2 and SP3 from the internet? I couldn't find them when I re-installed my OS a few weeks ago. Also, you should download drivers before the re-install and you should install IE8 because it's more secure than IE6 even if you don't use it.

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It is worth the time to download xp service pack 2 & 3 in advance. That way you can have them on CD and install them first.

Better to slipstream them and burn a new CD/DVD with the Windows installer, nLite (freeware) can do this.

 

I know all about the back tracking when installing Windows fresh, it seems some other non-Windows installs can wreak havoc - like HP printer/scanner drivers that killed off Windows immediately after it was installed and I had to redo it all from scratch, that was January 2010 and will never happen again since I have multiple images made with Macrium.

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There was some debate a while back about the benefits of installing SP3 as an update, or downloading an ISO to burn to disk.

 

That backup of SP3 on disk is nice to have, just in case.

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XP SP2 if you need it: HERE

 

I guess a good reason to have sp2 & sp3 on disk, iso or exe, is you can install them before you get on the 'net, saves download time, better security.

 

Anybody know of a way to get the current updates and save them, also? Like in a package?

 

Net framework will still be updating when the final trumpet sounds. :P

 

Thanks, Andvari, I really want to look into that nlite app. Sounds like the best thing since sliced bread.

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For those who wants to reinstall I can't give a complete guide how to create a master dvd to install everything you need as OpenOffice and all the tools and updates you want but just a tip: get this http://driverpacks.net/.

You won't beleave it. You can install almost every driver updated very easily. :P

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Anybody know of a way to get the current updates and save them, also? Like in a package?

Net framework will still be updating when the final trumpet sounds. :P

 

You'll need a DVD burner drive, and blank DVDs, get them right here: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/913086

 

Have a look http://www.msfn.org/board/topic/135066-onepiece-xp-post-sp3-aio-update-pack-v431/

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Even if making a "master dvd" it will be quickly outdated. Still though it's a good ideal to slipstream XP to SP3, that way when Windows boots up for the first time there will be better security from the get go with Windows Firewall enabled, although I install anti-virus last as it can seriously get in the way of driver installations.

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Wow, thanks a million, Andavari and geppetto. :D Those look like great time savers. Quite right that any disk will soon be outdated, but it will still put me far ahead of "square one". Thanks again.

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XP needs SP2 integrated.

 

It is stable, & it works with most things.

You can run XP with no SP & it's tons faster, about 2 or 3 times faster, but SP2 improves the built in firewall a lot + other security enhancements as well as adding support for much larger harddisk sizes.

 

SP3 should always be in folder on a flash drive as an Update.

 

Example:

 

Updates: Internet/Windows/Tweaks

 

Under Windows, a folder like Service Packs, then XP.

 

SP3 should NOT be integrated by default, because it can cause problems on certain AMD machines, or even blue screens of death. I know, Hazel, I know... It has a few things here & there + the claimed 10% speed increase, but I used computers enough to KNOW that these blue screens DO exist, & that SP3 DOES interfere with & cause certain WIFI networks to lose their packets & fail.

 

It also causes problems with other softwares at times.

 

So, yes, a SP2 integration is good, & an SP3 update to test. I say test, because it may work, or it may not. If you have intel chipsets, maybe you will be good, but then again, you may use a wifi device that suffers the SP3 bug & wigs out. Also, some AMD rigs may not have this problem, but I have used a few that were suffering on the SP3 myself. There is plenty of info on MS & pro tech websites concerning SP3 problems, so I know what I am talking about. It seems like SP2 machines just last longer before needing a refresh install, & that users have typically fewer problems due to the way the "protecting" code interferes with the operation of certain programs.

 

With SP3, keep it on hand, try it, but be warned. Your AMD or WiFi networks may suffer or die because of it. I have seen it first hand, and I know. SP3 is good to have when it works, but when it doesn't, it's good to have SP2 to fall back on. And if you integrate SP3, you cannot go back to SP2.

 

Remember, keep SP3 as an add-on, NOT as an integration!

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If you're going to install XP with no service pack you might as well be installing Windows 98SE or Windows 2000 instead.

It's buggy and full of security holes not to mention no LBA 48bit disk support so you're limited to 137GB max - http://support.microsoft.com/?id=303013

As for SP3 I have this installed on my laptop and I can honestly say the wifi connection is no better or worse than under SP2, i.e. nice and stable.

Like all hardware if there's a problem due to software conflicts then installing the latest drivers usually sorts them out.

 

Anyway I think slipsteam is better than installing SP3 over SP2: a) you get a clean virgin install of XP SP3 with no registry problems or conflicts, b) less time wasting since there's no SP2 to overwrite, c) no unwanted files left dumped on your drive (SP2 files), d) less change of errors during install e) the change install IE7/8 if that floats your boat.

As mentioned earlier nLite is a useful program to slipsteam SP3 into your XP install CD, not only that but it can be used to customised the components and remove stuff.

It also has the ability to tweak the folders names i.e. "Windows", "Program Files", "Documents and Settings" if you're clever enough you could have 2 bootable copies of XP co-existing on same drive like mine. :)

 

Richard S.

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SP3 should NOT be integrated by default, because it can cause problems on certain AMD machines, or even blue screens of death.

 

Perhaps a problem if you have an AMD machine but I personally don't and SP3 causes me no issues, I had more issues though with SP2 as an update breaking stuff.

 

I slipstreamed in SP2, then slipstreamed in SP3 over that (according to some Microsoft documentation I only glanced at), and then burned my DVD and have no issues with it albeit I have no plans to ever use that DVD installer again since I have disk images now.

 

Edit:

Your SP3 issues and advice I'd personally take with a grain of salt especially for people not using AMD.

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So, is nVidea officially dead? My new pooter has an ATI card. Works well so far. nVidea seemed to go bonkers on quad 3D war games and then they died, like so many velvet-lined quadrophonic vans.

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Nvidia's main problem in my opinion is with their drivers, I am as of yet to not find a build that isn't really buggy.

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If you're going to install XP with no service pack you might as well be installing Windows 98SE or Windows 2000 instead.

It's buggy and full of security holes not to mention no LBA 48bit disk support so you're limited to 137GB max - http://support.microsoft.com/?id=303013

As for SP3 I have this installed on my laptop and I can honestly say the wifi connection is no better or worse than under SP2, i.e. nice and stable.

Like all hardware if there's a problem due to software conflicts then installing the latest drivers usually sorts them out.

 

Anyway I think slipsteam is better than installing SP3 over SP2: a) you get a clean virgin install of XP SP3 with no registry problems or conflicts, b) less time wasting since there's no SP2 to overwrite, c) no unwanted files left dumped on your drive (SP2 files), d) less change of errors during install e) the change install IE7/8 if that floats your boat.

As mentioned earlier nLite is a useful program to slipsteam SP3 into your XP install CD, not only that but it can be used to customised the components and remove stuff.

It also has the ability to tweak the folders names i.e. "Windows", "Program Files", "Documents and Settings" if you're clever enough you could have 2 bootable copies of XP co-existing on same drive like mine. :)

 

Richard S.

 

I agree that nLite is very useful. In particular, I find it useful because I used it to slipstream:

 

- Drivers for drives that normally require 7 or Vista. Text mode raid etc.

- Drivers for netbooks

- Drivers for my webcam/pc drivers

 

Additionally, I use it to switch off certain services, in order to optimize the XP bootload time. Even though I have a fast machine, I like it faster.

Additionally still, I use it to automatically set up windows with no prompts for the key or network name since it is all integrated.

 

Now, about that SP3 deal.

It IS true that a lot of modern hardware has the issues sorted out.

HOWEVER! And this is a BIG however... If someone slipstreams SP3 & they DO happen to have the mentioned problems, you cannot remove a slipstreamed SP3.

You CAN uninstall SP3 if things do not go right, if you have a slipstreamed SP2 & then update to SP3.

 

That is the beauty of the SP2. It includes support for LBA, drives over 137 GB (2 TB), upgraded firewall, messenger service (spam network) turned off by default, etc. SP3 may work for some, but it may cause problems for others.

 

If your gonna have a dual boot, that can be messy as well. Single boot systems just seem to go longer with no problems than dual boot. Although dual boot systems can have a nice long life, overall, seems they cause more problems and are just less reliable that way. And why would you want to have double the number of files when you could be simply using it for something else?

 

So far as your WiFi connection, I will say this. For the people that have no problems, it seems great! Fantastic even! But if you happen to be one of the blue screeners, SP3 definitely causes far more probs than SP2 reguarding blue screens. It IS getting better with newer hardware & systems, but older systems/hardware still have problems sometimes with it. SP2 is just reliable about running most apps. SP3 is, kinda sorta, but it does cause some programs to crap out that work fine in SP2.

 

If your a daredevil, go for SP3.

If you want max compatibility, you will use SP2.

At least with SP2, you CAN update to SP3, but if you have SP3 integrated, you CAN'T revert to SP2...

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Additionally, I use it to switch off certain services, in order to optimize the XP bootload time.

I also did that with the slipstreamed nLite DVD I made for XP SP3 about 2 or 3 years ago (forget how long ago it was actually and too lazy to go grab the disc), and then just two weeks ago I read somewhere that should be avoided entirely.:huh: Way too late to find that out in my case.:rolleyes:

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Nvidia's main problem in my opinion is with their drivers, I am as of yet to not find a build that isn't really buggy.

 

Actually, you can replace "Nvidia" with "AMD" in that sentence, and it's correct too.

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I also did that with the slipstreamed nLite DVD I made for XP SP3 about 2 or 3 years ago (forget how long ago it was actually and too lazy to go grab the disc), and then just two weeks ago I read somewhere that should be avoided entirely.:huh: Way too late to find that out in my case.:rolleyes:

 

Oh well, it's nice that way.

 

Certain services can be safely turned off, although some of them have dependencies.

Requires much study to know what will be safe to disable without affecting networks, file operations, etc.

 

But it is safe. Key is, you gotta know what your doing.

Stripping too much outta an installation can cause probs, so I am verrrrry careful about that, but I do disable the windows messenger (older version, anyway, and will it even connect?) along with other tweaks...

 

Some tweaks seemed not to work, as I recall, such as not having IE or Outlook on the startmenu, while the default programs icon remover did work.

 

I believe I wasted some 30 or 40 CD's to find causes of errors & streamline the processes.

 

Well worth the final disk.

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I believe I wasted some 30 or 40 CD's to find causes of errors & streamline the processes.

 

Well worth the final disk.

I took me just one DVD+R disc.:P But then again like you stated I was very careful about what I was doing, if a service was questionable to have disabled I just left it alone and I did Google allot of services for info and posts on forums.

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My two cents...

 

I work at a local repair shop, and we commonly reinstall XP as a service to our customers. Yes, you can try and solve individual bugs and fix each single problem one by one... but at the end of the day, what do you want more, to spend 6 hours on a project not worth your time, or to have a nice, brand-new install done in half the time?

 

Anyway, we use SP3-integrated disks every time we reinstall (actually, we install every critical update, as well as .NET 4, available to XP). I've never experienced a problem with system instability or general odd-ness following a fresh XP SP3 install that couldn't be explained by failing/damaged hardware. We've done AMD, Intel, ATE, nVidia, Dell, HP, Acer, customer builds... you name, I've wiped the drive and re-installed XP with SP3 slipstreamed. Never once had a problem.

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