Jump to content
CCleaner Community Forums

Trying To Recover Deleted Photos and More From Emptied Recycle Bin On Windows 10


Recommended Posts

I actually deleted a very important picture along with several others screenshots and emptied the recycle bin not knowing it was in there with the other stuff. Me and my dad have used Recuva for years, but I don't fully understand what it's capable of. The first time I did a scan I did a deep scan for all pictures in the recycle bin but after realizing it was going to take way too long I canceled it in a few seconds, but when I did it still brought back thousands of pictures. I don't know how that's possible in just a few seconds. It included stuff from old browser data that I'd never saved, like pictures on webpages. However all scans since then have yielded nothing, even if I let it go the full time. Why? I've shut the computer down a few times since then, did that permanently, permanently destroy them? Is there a way I can still recover it, or anything and everything else from the recycle bin? With Recuva or any other software or process?

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Moderators

Nobody can say whether you can, or will, recover any deleted files. All you can do is try.

A deep scan runs a normal scan first, so when you chopped the deep scan you would have seen the results from the normal scan. This scans the MFT which is very fast. Running a deep scan on the recycler is not feasible, as the directory information is held in the MFT not at file level, and a deep scan looks for clusters containing files, not directories.

Files sent to the recycler are renamed, to $Ixxx.ext and $Rxxx.ext. The data part is held in the $R file. You could run a normal scan with $R in the filename box, or just look for $R files. A deep scan will not list the files under this or any name, as filenames are held in the MFT. (I have seen files deleted from the recycler return to their original names, I don't really know what rules the recycler follows.)

Link to post
Share on other sites

I tried doing both a deep scan and a normal scan in the recycle bin and while both said they were recovering hundreds of thousands of files, they ultimately returned nothing EXCEPT for the first one. I also very little experience doing stuff likes this, and I'm not sure what some of those terms like $R or MFT mean. Remember, this is after I rebooted the PC. And it only seems to return stuff when I cut it short, and the only stuff it does recover either lacks a preview or has one and is old browser cache data that the browser automatically clears, such as people profile icons on various sites. Odds are the "B" I have by default to the left could be recovered, but not anything I manually place in the recycle bin and then permenantly delete by emptying it. What would be the best way to get that kinda stuff, mainly pictures back, in layman's terms please.

 

On 20/05/2021 at 07:59, Augeas said:

Nobody can say whether you can, or will, recover any deleted files. All you can do is try.

A deep scan runs a normal scan first, so when you chopped the deep scan you would have seen the results from the normal scan. This scans the MFT which is very fast. Running a deep scan on the recycler is not feasible, as the directory information is held in the MFT not at file level, and a deep scan looks for clusters containing files, not directories.

Files sent to the recycler are renamed, to $Ixxx.ext and $Rxxx.ext. The data part is held in the $R file. You could run a normal scan with $R in the filename box, or just look for $R files. A deep scan will not list the files under this or any name, as filenames are held in the MFT. (I have seen files deleted from the recycler return to their original names, I don't really know what rules the recycler follows.)

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...