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Mudball

Password manager problem

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Im not sure if there is a tool in CCleaner that might help or not. I have a password manager, and every time I log into it, I receive an email saying that "they dont recognize me or Im either on a new device", which Im not, and when you click the provided link in that email they send to verify, it shows a different IP address from mine. I have run a full system scan, updated everything I can think of. Is there any tools in CCleaner that can help me with issue ? Should I be concerned ?

Thanks

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Concerned? I would be wary, but not too much to start with.

IP's can change, even at home your router may not allocate you the same IP everytime you connect to it.

New device isn't necessarily a problem. It's 'new' to their records not to you.
I hadn't been using my phone to logon to sites for a couple of months during lockdown (because I was always at home with a laptop) so when I did start using it again some sites had 'forgotten' it and saw it as a new device.

Databases can make errors, there is currently one forum I visit where users are sometimes unable to logon because the database thinks they have multiple failed logins. (And the IP it throws up for the failed login attempts is the forum security providers server, it seems to be taking some automatic security scans as failed logins).

It's not something that CCleaner could deal with, it's obviously the data that the password manager is holding that has been changed.

If there is a contact method for the password managers owners/admin then I'd contact them.

If you are realy concerned then you can always change all your passwords, (and your password manager if you realy need to use one).

TBH I've personally never liked the idea of password managers, if it's only in my head then nobody can hack it.
If you have a lot to remember then even writing them down on a piece of paper (not on your computer) means that somebody would have to physically break into your property to steal them, which is less likely than someone trying to hack a password manager.

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Thanks for that great explanation. I guess Im too paranoid. I really like the Password Manager, except when this particular incident happened. I must seriously contemplate your suggestions.

Thanks again.

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The thinking on secure passwords, and how to keep them secure, has changed a lot over the past ten or fifteen years.

'Never write them down' is just one of those that has changed, because as said it's easier to steal them online than to steal a piece of paper out of a desk drawer.

Some of what was once considered essential has on a rethink been shown to be excessive or even not secure at all.
Plus technologies change and old methods become, well old.

There is no need for complicated strings that a qubit computer couldn't guess in a million years, three random words is as good as anything for a password these days and not too difficult to remember.
EE routers use individual 3 word passwords.

PS. Do you know about the 3-word location system that can pinpoint you to a 3 meter square anywhere on the planet?
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-49319760

My 'secure' password has 2 words and includes the UK registration number of my grandads MkII Cortina in the 1970's.
As random a set of digits as you like, easy for me to remember, good luck to anyone else trying to guess or find it even with that clue.
(And then you'd still have to guess the other two words).

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Well said.

Thanks again for your time and explanation.

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