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From an Amateur.


Northern

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A browser is an application that resides on your personal machine and is able to interpret the programing languages that make up the entirety of the world wide web (such as html, php, css). Some common browsers are Internet explorer, Firefox, Chrome Opera, and Edge. A search engine is a website which resides on a server based network. Its software never appears on your machine; instead I takes the data you enter into a search box on its webpage (which you access by using the browser software on your PC) and runs it through its database looking for similar webbased-objects (usually webpages) that match your query. Finally the search engine writes out its results in a webpage format that your browser software can interpret (see above "browser" definition). SOME commonly known search engines are Google, Yahoo, Bing, duckDuckgo. Edit: after typing this reply, I, on a lark typed into my search engine of choice (Duckduckgo) the exact question " what is the difference between a browser and a search engine" My first result was http://www.differencebetween.net/technology/internet/difference-between-search-engine-and-browser/ So I'm not sure why you felt unable to find any explanations on the web.

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Yep, good article there linked to by @Nergal.

 

Sums up exactly what I was going to say;

 

Browser - gets me to the web.

Search Engine - lets me find things on the web.

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Basically differencebetween will answer pretty much any logical comparison (strangely there is a .net and a .com but they seem to be different companies...wierd)

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 So I'm not sure why you felt unable to find any explanations on the web.

I didn't say I was "unable to find any explanations on the web".

I said I had some difficulty fully understanding the explanations I found!

For example mta says a "search- engine lets me find things on the web" but a browser can do the same thing if, for example, one types a name, place name, or subject into the browser Google Chrome.

That can be puzzling for the amateur but I have a better understanding of the difference now!

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The search engine tells the browser what to look for.

 

 So if you type 'daffodils' into Firefox for instance, the default seach engine you have will tell Firefox to look for webpages with the word 'daffodils' in them.

 

The search engines can be changed to one of your choice in any browser you use.

 

http://www.pcworld.com/article/249158/how_to_change_your_browsers_default_search_engine.html

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@northern,

I can see your point.

I guess, just to muddy the water and maybe confuse you more, you could say about Browsers and Search Engines is - they need each other.

And to that point, they can be almost refereed to as the same beast.

You can't search the web without a browser and a browser is useless if it hasn't got a search function.

 

To give specifics; Firefox is a browser and Google is a search engine.  In years past you had to go to the Google page to be able to type something in to search for.

These days, all the browsers I've ever tried, you now simply type your search request in the address bar or in the search box of the browser itself and hit Enter.

No need to go to Google or Bing or any other search engines' page.

 

Maybe that's where the explanations have failed you.

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When you type "a name, place name or subject into the browser" it sends the typing (herein query) via http (web language protocol) to the search engine (again, a network of machines databasing a certain subject or the web itself). This is still the browser translating between yourself and the web.

 

Another way to look at it is without a browser a search engine looks like a bunch of noise (you might remember the sound of a modem)

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maybe this is harder to explain then first thought. :D

 

on one hand the two things are separate entities in their own right. (as has been explained in the above posts)

but on the other hand, they also work so close together that you could say they were two sides of the same coin.

 

you cannot use a search engine without using some web browser.

you could however navigate around the web without a search engine, but only if you knew the address of the site you wanted to go to.

 

for example, I want to get info on how to change the oil in the car.

since I don't know the web sites of organisations that could help me, I use a search engine and type in 'how to change my engine oil' and the search engine spits out thousands of sites that contain those keywords I entered into the search engine.  I then have to wade through the results, click on the sites that seem meaningful and see what they offer.

 

however, if I knew the site was www.eniginemaintenance.com then I could have simply typed that full address into the address bar and gone straight to the site.

but no one person knows all the addresses of the sites they want to go to, hence the need of a search engine.

 

so it's not a matter of using one or the other - you need both.

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How about this.

 

The browser is a phone, the search engine is the Yellow Pages

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How about this. The browser is a phone, the search engine is the Yellow Pages

I like that analogy; but I suppose it depends on whether the OP is old enough to remember the Yellow pages?

 

Apparently we are all abandoning some aspects of our memory and leaving it up to our devices instead.

 

I know that I don't bother memorising phone numbers like I used to.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-34454264

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I like that analogy; but I suppose it depends on whether the OP is old enough to remember the Yellow pages?

 

Lol that's why I avoided the card catalog analogy

 

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