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Secure File Delete [overwrite 35 passes]


woodycreek

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I've used Secure File Delete before on an old computer with HDD Windows XP, but since purchasing a new PC [Windows 7] and installing CCleaner last week I'm wondering about using this tool in the future since I have SSD now.

 

This is mainly re: financial info. and such. There are some forms, jpeg's, png - etc. from time to time I like to delete, in doing so most of time I like to use the Secure File Delete / with overwrite 35 passes. My 1st question is in doing this with ''overwrite 35 passes'' is this going to damage or shorten life of the SSD? Also 2nd question is if I Defragment will this damage or shorten life of SSD?

 

Has anyone else gone through this? Any comments welcome.

 

Regards...

Regards,

Greg Adams

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1.) Yes, this will shorten the lifetime of your SSD. If you really need to use Secure Deletion, I would advise you to use less passes.

 

2.) Defragmenting won't make your SSD faster because of the way it access files. It would also damage your SSD like Secure Deletion..

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1) SSD are limited greatly by the total number of writes to the drive. writes include files (including temporary and permanent ones), wipes (per pass, including checking wipe freespace in the advanced section of ccleaner's cleaning routine) defragmentations ( @Pilzsuppe outlined in #2 above this very well), etc

 

 

ADVICE FOR USING CCleaner'S REGISTRY INTEGRITY SECTION

DON'T JUST CLEAN EVERYTHING THAT'S CHECKED OFF.

Do your Registry Cleaning in small bits (at the very least Check-mark by Check-mark)

ALWAYS BACKUP THE ENTRY, YOU NEVER KNOW WHAT YOU'LL BREAK IF YOU DON'T.

CCLEANER, RECUVA, DEFRAGGLER AND SPECCY DOCUMENTATION CAN BE FOUND AT  https://support.piriform.com/hc/en-us and  https://www.ccleaner.com/docs

Pro users file a PRIORITY SUPPORT request at https://support.piriform.com/hc/en-us/requests/new

link to WINAPP2.INI explanation

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If TRIM is enabled, and I assume it is by default, and the SSD is an internal drive, then TRIM is exactly the same as a secure delete. You need to do nothing except delete the file. The data cannot be recovered after a TRIM command has been issued and acted upon.

 

SSD defrags are a no-no, as has been mentioned.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Since I upgraded to the latest Recuva version, Secure Overwrite Highlighted/Checked does not work. I am getting the following status for each file I try to overwrite; " "Not overwritten - More data is available".  Any ideas? thanks

Edited by Augeas
This is not really relevant to this thread - please keep to the other thread you have posted in.
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Since I upgraded to the latest Recuva version, Secure Overwrite Highlighted/Checked does not work. I am getting the following status for each file I try to overwrite; " "Not overwritten - More data is available".  Any ideas? thanks

Please start your own thread as this is a separate issue

 

ADVICE FOR USING CCleaner'S REGISTRY INTEGRITY SECTION

DON'T JUST CLEAN EVERYTHING THAT'S CHECKED OFF.

Do your Registry Cleaning in small bits (at the very least Check-mark by Check-mark)

ALWAYS BACKUP THE ENTRY, YOU NEVER KNOW WHAT YOU'LL BREAK IF YOU DON'T.

CCLEANER, RECUVA, DEFRAGGLER AND SPECCY DOCUMENTATION CAN BE FOUND AT  https://support.piriform.com/hc/en-us and  https://www.ccleaner.com/docs

Pro users file a PRIORITY SUPPORT request at https://support.piriform.com/hc/en-us/requests/new

link to WINAPP2.INI explanation

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  • 2 months later...

1.) Yes, this will shorten the lifetime of your SSD. If you really need to use Secure Deletion, I would advise you to use less passes.

 

2.) Defragmenting won't make your SSD faster because of the way it access files. It would also damage your SSD like Secure Deletion..

Thanks, appreciate the info.

Regards,

Greg Adams

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If TRIM is enabled, and I assume it is by default, and the SSD is an internal drive, then TRIM is exactly the same as a secure delete. You need to do nothing except delete the file. The data cannot be recovered after a TRIM command has been issued and acted upon.

 

SSD defrags are a no-no, as has been mentioned.

I appreciate the information.

Regards,

Greg Adams

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1) SSD are limited greatly by the total number of writes to the drive. writes include files (including temporary and permanent ones), wipes (per pass, including checking wipe freespace in the advanced section of ccleaner's cleaning routine) defragmentations ( @Pilzsuppe outlined in #2 above this very well), etc

Nergal thanks for response/info.

Regards,

Greg Adams

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Before I leave this topic I have another question. I was under the impression since Windows 7 and 8 came along that vendors were all going route of using SSD's instead of HDD, am I wrong? If this is true then why is there a secure deletion even offered since it will damage the SSD?

Regards,

Greg Adams

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As far as I'm aware vendors are still supplying hdd's, and will continue to do so until they can get 2 or 3 tb SSD's. I guess there will be a gradual movement towards hybrids and SSD's in time. Just browse an online supplier to see what's being offered.

 

Secure delete will continue to be offered as zillions of us are still bashing away on hdd's, and in some circumstances secure delete can be useful on an SSD.

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As far as I'm aware vendors are still supplying hdd's, and will continue to do so until they can get 2 or 3 tb SSD's. I guess there will be a gradual movement towards hybrids and SSD's in time. Just browse an online supplier to see what's being offered.

 

Secure delete will continue to be offered as zillions of us are still bashing away on hdd's, and in some circumstances secure delete can be useful on an SSD.

Okay, thanks.

Regards,

Greg Adams

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