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Save Registry Backup by Default


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This is very debatable.

 

Debatable? It's m$ coding standards now. Just to expand on Nergals post. Vista and higher takes special permissions to write to Program Files. Programs live here. Not data. Imagine if any one could just write to this location? replacing important exe.

 

Microsoft now suggests 3 places to consider.

 

  • Common AppData, which is shared by all users
  • Non-roaming AppData, which is specific to the computer.
  • Roaming AppData, which will be part of a user's profile if they are on a domain.

 

Roaming AppData would be best considered here. Would ensure users who had the program installed on multiple computers on a domain, the settings would not needed to be set up on each machine

 

Just realized i'm going off topic here so i will end here.

 

sorry

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I came to the CCleaner suggestions forum to promote an idea that CCleaner should create a default folder...

 

I think so too, but it doesn't matter much where the folder is created, does it? I created one on an external USB drive and CCleaner now puts all reg backups there, renamed as suggested by Kroozer. Been so long I don't remember where the backups go by default. (Wide open for a potshot from DennisD...come on, Dennis, that one is too easy. :unsure: )

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It would be better to store any .REG backups made by CCleaner in the users application data folder, or even the users My Documents folder so multiple users aren't guessing which .REG file they'd need to import to fix an issue.

 

Importing .REG backups would of course be made much simpler for all users (not just those which are new to CCleaner) if CCleaner would have some way to manage the backups to either delete them if they aren't needed and to restore them from within the program itself like so many other registry cleaners do.

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I think so too, but it doesn't matter much where the folder is created, does it? I created one on an external USB drive and CCleaner now puts all reg backups there, renamed as suggested by Kroozer. Been so long I don't remember where the backups go by default. (Wide open for a potshot from DennisD...come on, Dennis, that one is too easy. :unsure: )

 

I have no idea what you mean!! :huh:

 

I'm shocked that you would think such a thing. Even after your daily afternoon naps. :lol:

 

I think we're getting somewhere with this.

 

An automated CCleaner reg file backup, keeping only a set number on a rolling basis, saved automatically to a CCleaner install created "Application Data" folder, and if the need arises, restored automatically from the same folder.

 

No user input needed other than the initial y/n on the first run to agree or not to use the feature.

 

That sounds pretty good to me.

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It's not debatable because

1) Microsoft Finally Saw the error of their ways, no other OS stores leaves program folders Writable by The User (they at least require some form of SuperUserDO (i.e. UAC))

2) To allow to write in that folder lets the computer be compromised

3) I don't use a multiuser system but my OS makes me sign in (Whether it is Windows Linux or MAC a user is signing in (even if autosignin). Else we're using Windows98/millennium which allowed users to Cancel the login and still use the PC and was VERY insecure

 

Major headache here, lol!

 

1) Microsoft Finally Saw the error of their ways, no other OS stores leaves program folders Writable by The User (they at least require some form of SuperUserDO (i.e. UAC))--> http://www.betanews.com/article/Sophos-study-suggests-Windows-7-UACs-default-setting-is-selfdefeating/1257455306 It seems this is all too easy to defeat. I also read about a 2 stage malware attack where they would set themselves up as part of a shortcut to a program so that when a user clicks the program & grants it permission, the malware is run as part of this & gets the same elevation --> http://www.zdnet.com/blog/security/defeating-uac-with-a-two-stage-malware-attack/203

 

2) To allow to write in that folder lets the computer be compromised. --> Malware primarily installs to Program Files folder, App Data, System32. It can install to Windows, but System32 is a verrrrry common place. Just wondered. How does this secure Windows by blocking only 1 possible location?

 

3) I don't use a multiuser system but my OS makes me sign in (Whether it is Windows Linux or MAC a user is signing in (even if autosignin). Else we're using Windows98/millennium which allowed users to Cancel the login and still use the PC and was VERY insecure. --> My understanding is that while 98/ME both let you hit ESC to login, they will block certain Admin only activities until you do login. The main security of XP SP2 & higher seems to be the integrated firewall.

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An automated CCleaner reg file backup, keeping only a set number on a rolling basis, saved automatically to a CCleaner install created "Application Data" folder, and if the need arises, restored automatically from the same folder.

 

That sounds pretty good to me.

 

Sounds good to me, except your leaving out the portable users here.

 

You may be worried that CCleaner would then make many backups from many machines so that the wrong reg-key is imported.

I have the solution to this.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Build CCleaner to automatically backup registry keys with the machine name + time & date stamp.

By machine name, I don't mean the right-click/my computer name, I mean the name that shows in DXDIAG utility, & includes: HP Compaq dc7600 convertible minitower.

That is just an example, but CCleaner could be made to refuse any import that did not exactly match the machine name given to the registry key when backed up.

 

Example: CCleaner backs up the registry with HP_Compaq_dc7600_convertible-mini - 1:31am - Oct 18 2010

User tried to import a key stating that it was: Acer_Inspire_fg100 - 2:54pm - Oct 18 2010.

CCleaner sees that this doesn't match the HP machine key & refuses to import.

 

This would mean that CCleaner would have to have a registry import key built in (safe import) where it could show users green for keys that matched the machine model & red for keys that cannot be installed. The option to delete keys from here would be nice as well. CCleaner would have to have an option to set the default folder to check for registry keys, such as it's own folder when run portably.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

This would block a lot of users from damaging their machines by using the wrong keys for the wrong machines.

The beauty of this is that it would work whether CCleaner was run portably or they used it on an installed machine.

 

* I do realize it would be possible to edit or change the name, so I thought of an alternative if this sounds better.

 

CCleaner could write the machine name inside the registry key upon save. If they user used safe import, CCleaner would automatically import the key minus the machine name stamp. This would allow them to name the key whatever they wanted. I think I actually like this idea better.

 

Users could still import keys manually, & the extra date stamp wouldn't hurt anything, but they should be using CCleaner to verify the registry keys match the machine they were created on... Shouldn't they?

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Sounds good to me, except your leaving out the portable users here.

 

You may be worried that CCleaner would then make many backups from many machines so that the wrong reg-key is imported.

I have the solution to this.

 

Users could still import keys manually, & the extra date stamp wouldn't hurt anything, but they should be using CCleaner to verify the registry keys match the machine they were created on... Shouldn't they?

 

I am horrified.

 

I seem to recall that you maintain computers for many clients.

 

It seems to me that you would effectively hold their registries hostage when you walk out the door with the registry backups on your flash drive.

 

Even assuming you will not take advantage of them deliberately,

their computers will never be the same again if you and your flash-drive walk under a bus ! ! !

 

Alan

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