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Andavari

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Everything posted by Andavari

  1. That doesn't look at all like a legit Microsoft installed program that would come with Microsoft Edge.
  2. Hence the reason I posted those links. Most things for Chromium should work, unless they've did something very different.
  3. If Windows doesn't see it as a device you can open normally like how you can open a USB flash drive or USB disk drive the answer is no.
  4. As long as they have the correct file extension renaming them wouldn't make a difference. If they're actually intact it would mean they have proper header information and should play. Like I mentioned in that other old topic you linked to sometimes re-saving a video (not re-encoding/transcoding which causes quality degradation) with the free Avidemux tool I mentioned can if it's just a missing header make the file playable again since it creates a new header so media players (software & hardware) know what the file is and how to play it. Avidemux is no guarantee however, it's just som
  5. Recuva doesn't create/save a list, it's only what's displayed within it as it's resident. Therefore if you close Recuva it unfortunately means you'll have to start all over from scratch with it scanning for deleted files.
  6. See if this works, it doesn't require installing anything since it's just a settings change: https://www.lifewire.com/enable-flash-in-chrome-4160696 If that doesn't work see here: https://helpx.adobe.com/flash-player/kb/flash-player-chromium.html
  7. You may be able to restore the lost partition without doing any formatting whatsoever but you'll have to use a 3rd party partitioning tool since what's built into Windows can't accomplish the task to my knowledge. Perhaps Easus Partition Master or MiniTool Partition Wizard can do it, both offer a freeware version but I don't know if the free mode will be able to do that, you may have to buy a license. Both programs are similar and both are good.
  8. You're always better off to replace the disk drive and install Windows fresh onto it, allowing you to keep the original disk drive. Since that's an expense, and to negate it you could use Wipe Free Space -- but make sure you use a recover scan tool (such as Recuva, etc.,) afterwards to make sure sensitive documents, etc., have actually been wiped and aren't recoverable. If you have the Windows install disks I'd personally use DBAN (free/open source) to nuke the data on the disk, and then install Windows fresh onto it. Probably one of the safer more thorough approaches versus trying to wip
  9. I've asked in your staff area. It's an intriguing question that nobody has asked yet and it's an important question because on Windows XP the Slim build has to be used in order for it to install correctly. They don't have any old builds archived/visible for download on their main download page, or their builds download page. Hopefully they answer in here and provide a link.
  10. If you can't wait. To change things like that in mass in a text document I use Metapad (it's outdated), but I suppose something more modern like Notepad++ could also achieve it. You'd just need to use the Replace feature. Edit: Actually Notepad can do it. The one caveat using it though is it doesn't count/tell you how many items it changed - but it does work!
  11. I wouldn't get any hopes of them fixing it anytime soon, and they obviously would have to know about it by now with a myriad of other issues. They have a bugs list a mile long which to be honest is likely more critical than that one pesky file it creates, which it can subsequently also delete by itself if you use Custom Clean and include the C:\Temp path for cleaning.
  12. If I'm trying to find anything in particular on forums I just use a search engine which more than often will find it versus the forums built-in search. For instance just searching for CCleaner Dup Bug finds the topic about it on DuckDuckGo. Although since CCleaner has the built in Duplicate Finder that will muddy the search.
  13. Also it's only meant to be used on hard disk drives, not with SSDs.
  14. Make sure it's correctly detecting your SSD as an SSD because for some people the detection is incorrect. If correctly detected as an SSD all it would do is run a Trim command if I'm not mistaken. If however it detects it incorrectly as an HDD don't run it, since it will do a traditional defrag.
  15. Many defrag tools aren't of much use at all without at least 20% free space. If you don't have enough free space many will just give up. The only defrag tool that I've ever seen that will defrag very full disks was the now discontinued/unsupported and old JkDefrag (free) which is still available as a PortableApps.com version. Edit - Note: If the disk you're having the issue with is a non-OS disk that doesn't have Windows installed onto it I wouldn't bother with trying to defragment that one pesky file because the disk will quickly get fragmented again, and non-OS hard disks don't usuall
  16. Also make sure you're not using any incognito mode for Chromium/Chrome based browsers, since the Chrome Web Store won't work for installing in that mode.
  17. Yes, and since I don't/won't use Health Check I always forget about it ignoring any user settings. There's a good write up on Health Check and Custom Clean by Nukecad located here: https://community.ccleaner.com/topic/57945-question-about-ccleaner-smart-clean-and-run-ccleaner/?do=findComment&comment=318341
  18. You need to configure the Cookies to Keep list if you haven't done so yet, see here: https://www.ccleaner.com/docs/ccleaner/ccleaner-settings/choosing-which-cookies-to-keep
  19. You have to go into Recuva's settings and enable a setting to have it "Restore folder structure." That probably details starting over from scratch and doing the restore again.
  20. The Google Chrome offer is still ticked by default, and so will still end up with unwanted installs if people click through without carefully looking at what the installer shows. I don't know if they'd get paid for in-house offers like Avast Antivirus and AVG Antivirus since they're all owned and/or merged with Avast, however the Google offer they would obviously monetize. Suppose it's the "price to pay" for using freeware, and one does have to really slow down when installing software to make sure "offers" aren't inadvertently installed. The ultimate solution is to of course always use z
  21. Since they're network aware the OEM's should just send out a killbit to disable them when a system will no longer get any updates; BIOS, Drivers, OEM Utilities, etc. Although with that stated Dell seems very good at feeding their older systems updates, I notice my mother's 2014 Dell Inspiron business laptop gets regular enough updates to not even warrant manually looking for any of them.
  22. And if importing/restoring the .REG file backup fails (and it seems to fail sometimes) you may have to resort to restoring from a recent System Restore Point - that is if you have one since Windows 10 disables System Protection/System Restore by default unless the user manually enables it themselves.
  23. Live Tiles as mentioned is what had my head spinning when I first starting using Windows 10 and noticed things coming back rapidly such as Cache and Cookies that I didn't want. If you like such Live Tiles features being left active and installed in Windows 10 there's likely not too much that can be done since cleaning their contents will only have Windows 10 re-download them in quick fashion. I've uninstalled all of the apps that exist as Live Tiles (it's possible to do via Power Shell) and don't have that issue, although in doing so I also don't have nice things like the Weather app, etc
  24. Some of the OEM bloatware runs from Task Scheduler, so worth looking in there too.
  25. I have all of my email provider ad spam go directly into Trash, it's easy to do if all the junkmail comes from a particular unique email address that they'll always use.
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