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Zone54

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About Zone54

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  1. MSE works flawlessly on my antiquated machine with XP and 1.5G RAM. I'd never heard of any concern over XP until reading the replies to this thread. From MS: http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/security_essentials/ProductInformation.aspx Microsoft Security Essentials uses smart caching and active memory swapping so signatures that are not in use are not taking up space, thus limiting the amount of memory used even as the volume of known malware continues to increase. This makes Microsoft Security Essentials friendlier toward older PCs, as well as today?s smaller, less powerful form factors such as netbooks. http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/security_essentials/SystemRequirements.aspx Minimum system requirements for Microsoft Security Essentials Operating System: Genuine Windows XP Service Pack 3 (SP3); Windows Vista (Gold, Service Pack 1, or Service Pack 2); Windows 7* * For Windows XP, a PC with a CPU clock speed of 500 MHz or higher, and 256 MB RAM or higher. * For Windows Vista and Windows 7, a PC with a CPU clock speed of 1.0 GHz or higher, and 1 GB RAM or higher.
  2. Ctrl and PrtSc, then edit in Paint?
  3. Quoting myself! If anyone's interested this is how it appears to work: Disabling the service will kill the program after running it. Having it set to manual appears to leave it running until restarting the computer.
  4. I decided to disable the service (it's a slower machine and the difference is noticeable), and haven't noticed any difference. Is there any reason one shouldn't do that?
  5. And if I'd seen this post first I wouldn't have added it to the post in the Security section! So here I go adding another pointless addition to the forum!
  6. http://www.mvps.org/winhelp2002/hosts.htm Updated Oct-08-2009
  7. MVPS Hosts File Updated Sep. 02. Interesting to note inclusion of tcr.tynt.com, a text copy reporting site, that's becoming quite popular.
  8. Yes, recommended by me. I like it because you can edit .pdf files (add comments, highlight, etc...). It is just as fast as FoxIt, and runs far less resources than Adobe. PDR xchange viewer does not require an add-on that I know of.
  9. http://www.docu-track.com/?product/pdfx_viewer/ There's a fine alternative called PDF-XCHANGE VIEWER, that allows one to alter pdf files (highlight, add notes, e.g.). I find this quite handy.
  10. HA! "Seinfeld to sing the praises of Windows Vista" http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20080...dows-vista.html "...Microsoft hopes that a new $300 million ad campaign about the flailing Windows Vista will somehow turn it into a success..." "Vista's reputation has certainly taken a beating since its launch, and Microsoft said last month that it was finally going to do something about it."
  11. Zone54

    editing pdf

    You can try this one, I have found it quite helpful in this regard, and it is free: http://www.docu-track.com/home/prod_user/P...ols/pdfx_viewer Some commentary here: http://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?t=214135
  12. Indeed one of the finer utilities available. I just went from ver. 9.12, out in 2005, to ver. 11.4! Thanks for bringing it to my attention. It is a faster version, I'm sure among other advertised features.
  13. Just yesterday binned Foxit for PDF Exchange viewer. http://www.docu-track.com/home/prod_user/pdfx_viewer/ Nice program, you should try it!
  14. Humpty, I'm not so sure about that. Consider this comment from University of Maryland physicist Bob Park: "Must I now lecture a chemistry professor on thermodynamics? More energy is needed to free hydrogen than you get by burning it." http://www.bobpark.org/ (1. WARNING! TURN OFF THE RADAR BEFORE THE OCEAN IGNITES.)
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